New issue: Angry Violist 5.5

Hello. I have made a zine in 24 hours in honour of International Zine Month 2012.

The zine was thought-up, written, typeset, copied and assembled entirely within a 24 hour period. Since I don’t have a printer, the zine was made using typewriter and letraset transfers.

And, oh yeah, none of it is edited.

The mini-issue contains writing about:

  • Understanding our hierarchy of music, sound and noise
  • Plugging in and going electric after being an acoustic musician for years
  • I ❤ Michael Karoli, violinist for Can
  • When music and psychology collide: Stendhal syndrome and the White Christmas experiment
  • Vulnerability and creativity: about insecurity as a musician. (I keep wanting to refer to this article and the subject matter of this article as “music therapy”, but that is something entirely different. It’s really about the psychological pitfalls of being a musician. Performance psychology, I suppose.)

Every cover is different

You can buy it from my Etsy shop or, my preferred method of transaction, by emailing me about some kind of swap/trade.
This issue of the zine is A6 (quarter size) and is 20 pages long, b&w and staple-bound. The back is hand-library-stamped and the cover has hand-drawn spirographs.

I made this zine in 24 hours: there are a LOT of typos, please don’t judge me.

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the Music in Angry Violist issue 4

This is a bit belated, but anyway: here’s youtube clips to illustrate all the music I mentioned in Issue 4 of the zine.

from the interview with Vicki Aspinall of The Raincoats
Fairytale in the Supermarket, The Raincoats (1979)

from the Krautstringsampler
The Birth of liquid plejades, Tangerine Dream (1972)

Aumgn, Can (1971)

Requiem für einen wicht, Hölderlin (1971)

She came through the chimney, Amon Düül (1970)

Folk versus punk article
American folk versus European folk: how Irish folk ditty Shule Aroon became the American folk song Johnny has gone for a soldier
Shule Aroon:
Johnny has gone for a soldier:

See also, “My country, tis of thee” which is the American version of the British national anthem, “God save the queen”. I’ve not posted links here because they are both unspeakably awful. Here’s the Sex Pistols version of reappropriating God save the queen (1977) instead:

About being a messy musician
Ron Asheton, the anti-Steve Vai, playing on the Stooges’ Dirt (1970)

Venus in Furs, Velvet Underground (1967)

Chinese White, Incredible String band (1967)

**Dirt sounds incredible against the Tangerine Dream track – play them both at once!

R.I.P. Conrad Schnizler

Tangerine Dream and Krautrock pioneer/violinist Conrad Schnitzler sadly passed away this week. He was featured as the *centre of nearly everything* in my Krautrock Family Tree from issue 4 of the zine.

“You might not believe it, because I’m laughing away here and we’re having fun, but I hate people.”

Read a great interview with him from 2006 in the Wire, issue 206.